The Dry Eye Zone

Rebecca's Blog

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Abstract: A flap is a flap

This study says whether your flap was made by a keratome or a femtosecond laser is immaterial as regards potential for dry eye symptoms. Apparently not funded by a microkeratome manufacturer, either.

Dry eye after laser in situ keratomileusis with femtosecond laser and mechanical keratome.
PURPOSE:
To prospectively compare dry-eye symptoms after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) with mechanical keratome-created flaps and femtosecond laser keratome-created flaps.

SETTING:
Department of Ophthalmology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA.

DESIGN:
Randomized clinical trial.

METHODS:
Fellow eyes were prospectively randomized to the mechanical keratome group and femtosecond laser keratome group. Patients had wavefront-guided LASIK using a mechanical keratome in 1 eye and a femtosecond laser keratome in the fellow eye. They completed dry-eye questionnaires preoperatively and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. The effect of laser ablation depth, sex, age, and flap thickness on dry-eye symptoms was also analyzed.

RESULTS:
The study enrolled 51 patients. There was no statistically significant change in dry-eye symptoms except in the femtosecond group 1 month postoperatively (mean increase 1.08) (P=.03). There were no significant differences in symptoms between the 2 groups (P=.7). The dry-eye score was 1.3 points lower in women than in men (P=.01). Central ablation depth, flap thickness, and age did not significantly affect the reported dryness.

CONCLUSION:
There appeared to be no statistically significant difference in self-reported dry-eye symptoms between the mechanical keratome group and the femtosecond laser keratome group.

FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE:
Neither author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned.


J Cataract Refract Surg. 2011 Jun 16. [Epub ahead of print]
Golas L, Manche EE.
Source
From Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA.
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