The Dry Eye Zone

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Abstract: Unnamed artificial tear

Eye Contact Lens. 2009 May;35(3):149-55. Links
An investigation of the efficacy of a novel ocular lubricant.

Dumbleton K, Woods C, Fonn D.
Centre for Contact Lens Research, School of Optometry, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada. kdumble@uwaterloo.ca

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy of a novel ocular lubricant compared with a commercially marketed ocular lubricant in a group of noncontact lens wearers currently using over-the-counter products for the management of symptoms of moderate to severe dry eye.

METHODS: This was a prospective, double-masked study that randomized 110 subjects in a ratio of 1:1 to receive a novel ocular lubricant (test group) or a marketed ocular lubricant (control group). Subjects were instructed to instill the lubricant eye drops at least three times daily. After enrollment, subjects were evaluated at baseline and at 7 and 30 days. They were also required to complete a series of home-based subjective questionnaires after 15 days. Main outcomes were subjective symptoms and objective clinical assessment at 7 and 30 days.

RESULTS: The test group had higher overall comfort ratings than the control group (P = 0.012). Seventy-one percent of the test group and 57% of the control group said the drops used "somewhat" or "definitely" improved ocular comfort; 62% of the test group had greater end-of-day comfort compared with 45% of the control group (P = 0.015). There were no between-group differences in visual acuity, tear quality or quantity, corneal staining, conjunctival staining, or bulbar and limbal conjunctival hyperemia.

CONCLUSIONS: The novel ocular lubricant offers equivalent or superior comfort compared with a marketed lubricant eye drop. Objective clinical outcomes were not statistically significantly different between the two groups.
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