The Dry Eye Zone

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Study: Childhood diabetes and dry eye

Not too much to comment on here. Basically... the non-news that kids with Type 1 diabetes are more likely to have dry eyes than kids without.

Dry eye syndrome in diabetic children.
Akinci A, Cetinkaya E, Aycan Z.
Eur J Ophthalmol. 2007 Nov-Dec;17(6):873-8.

PURPOSE. To compare the symptoms, signs, and results of objective tests for dry eye syndrome (DES) in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients and controls.
METHODS. A total of 104 children with T1DM and 104 age- and sex-matched controls were compared in terms of the symptoms, signs, and results of objective tests for DES. Duration of T1DM, presence of diabetic retinopathy, mean hemoglobin A1c level, pubertal status, and a history of accompanying autoimmune disease were noted in T1DM group. Analysis of variance, multivariate regression analysis, Student t, Mann-Whitney U, and chi-square tests were used for statistical analysis.
RESULTS. A total of 15.4% of diabetic children complained of dry eye symptoms, versus 1.9% of the controls (p=0.029). Dry eye signs were detected in 7.7% of diabetic children, versus 0.96% of controls (p=0.034). Tear break-up time (TBUT) and Schirmer test results were significantly lower in T1DM group than controls (p=0.018, p=0.024, respectively). A total of 7.7% of diabetic children had definite and 0.96% had probable diagnosis of DES, versus none of the controls (p=0.03). TBUT and Schirmer test results were significantly lower in patients with more than 10 years duration of T1DM (p<0.001 for both).
CONCLUSIONS. The prevalence of symptoms, signs, and definite diagnosis of DES are higher and basal tear secretion and tear film stability are lower in diabetic children than controls. Duration of T1DM is the only disease-related variable which is associated with basal tear secretion and tear film stability.
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