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Thread: Blepharitis - squamous

  1. #1

    Blepharitis - squamous

    Hi

    Yes its me again - sorry it looks like I am dominating this board a bit - you guys shouldnt be so damn knowledgeable (and unfortunately, experienced)!

    I just wanted to ask about blepharitis - when examining my eyelids my doctor said I had a mild blepharitis, mild in the sense that he could only see it using the slit lamp.

    He said it was 'squamous' and although I never asked him at the time - I wonder what is the difference between this and bacterial blepharitis, or is there none.

    Ive asked the question here because Ive searched on the net and cant find anything, either that or I just dont understand what Im reading.

    Many thanks.

  2. #2
    Id be intersted in know also that is what I was origonally told I had then I am now told it was serrobic blepharitis but the thing troubling me is the mgd. I thin if the mgd wasent so bad this would not be so annoying. Squamus mean of unknown origin I do believe of without finding I asked a few times before on another site with no response I think people think I smell and dont want to talk to me lol.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    From http://www.doctoronline.nhs.uk/maste...l/blephari.asp

    What is blepharitis?
    Blepharitis is a condition affecting the eyelids. There are two types:

    Squamous blepharitis
    A long term condition which may be associated with dandruff in the hair. Eyelids are red, scaly and sore or itchy.

    Ulcerative blepharitis
    Lids are red, painful and ulcerated due to infection.

    How is blepharitis treated?
    The treatment for blepharitis is regular cleaning of the eyelids for so long as the symptoms persist.

    There are a number of options for doing this:

    * Clean the eyelids near the lash margin thoroughly, morning and evening, using sodium bicarbonate solution:
    o Boil some water, then let it cool to room temperature.
    o Pour 100 mls (1/4 pint) of the water into a clean cup.
    o Dissolve one teaspoon of bicarbonate of soda (not baking powder) in the water.
    o Store in the fridge and discard after 24 hours.
    * Clean the eyelids as above with a weak solution of Johnson's baby shampoo, diluted one third with cooled boiled water.
    * To clean the eyelids, use either cotton buds as in the diagram, or a clean face flannel.
    o In acute cases of blepharitis, yo...

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by neil0502
    From http://www.doctoronline.nhs.uk/maste...l/blephari.asp

    What is blepharitis?
    Blepharitis is a condition affecting the eyelids. There are two types:

    Squamous blepharitis
    A long term condition which may be associated with dandruff in the hair. Eyelids are red, scaly and sore or itchy.
    Thanks, I guess thats why he asked me if I use medicated shampoo! I dont really suffer with dandruff but Its worth a try.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    Lightbulb Squamous vs seborrheic

    According to my Tabers medical dictionary:

    Seborrheic means afflicted with or like seborrhea. Seborrhea is a functional disease of the sebaceous glands marked by an increase in the amount, and often an alteration of the quality, of the sebaceous secretion.

    Squamous means scalelike. Squamous epithelium is the flat form of epithelial cells. The eipithelium is the layer of cells forming the epidermis of the skin and the surface layer of mucous and serous membranes. The epithelium may include goblet cells. It is what makes up the conjunctivia and the lining of the eyelids.

    So, seborrheic blepharitis is a condition where there is a problem in (or inflammation of) the oil secreting glands.

    Squamous blepharitis is a condition where there is a problem in (or inflammation of) the skin, mucous membranes or goblet cells.

    Blepharitis is simply an ulcerative or nonulcerative inflammation of the hair follicles and glands along the edges of the eyelids.

    Hmmm, wonder if we should rename DES to OGD, "Ocular Glandular Dysfunction"?
    Every day with DES is like a box of chocolates...You never know what you're going to get.

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