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Thread: list of allergy drops

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    Outside of Atlanta
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    list of allergy drops

    I found this online at allergies.about.com
    * Many contain bak.
    It is a consideration, but I still use Zadiator when needed


    Prescription eye drops. Eye drops in prescription forms are available in five types, based on how the medication works. Decongestant and decongestant/anti-histamine combination drops are also available in prescription forms, which are equivalent to other-the-counter formulations. Other than decongestant forms of eye drops, none of the prescription eye drops are associated with conjunctivitis medicamentosa with long-term use.

    1) Anti-histamine eye drops. This medication, currently only available as emedastine (Emadine®), works well to treat eye allergies on an "as-needed" basis. Older forms of ant-histamine eye drops have been discontinued.
    2) Mast cell stabilizer eye drops. These medications have been around for many years, and work well to prevent allergic conjunctivitis symptoms if used before allergen exposure. These are available as cromolyn (Crolom® and generics), nedocromil (Alocril® and generics), lodoxamide (Alomide®) and pemirolast (Alamast®). These medications are not as helpful when used on an "as needed" basis.
    3) Anti-histamine/mast cell stabilizer dual-action eye drops. The newest generation of allergy eye drops is superior to either of the single action agents. This class of medication includes olopatadine (Patanol®), azelastine (Optivar®), epinastine (Elestat®) and ketotifen (Zaditor®). These medications block the effects of histamine and prevent mast cells from releasing the chemicals responsible for allergy symptoms.
    4) Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory eye drops. Ketorolac (Acular®) is indicated for the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis, and works in a similar way as aspirin and ibuprofen. Those with aspirin sensitivity or intolerance should not use this medication.
    5) Corticosteroid eye drops. Use of steroid eye drops can lead to severe complications if not used with caution and under the close supervision of a physician experienced in the use of these medications. Complications can include glaucoma, cataract formation, and severe eye infections. One type of steroid eye drop, loteprednol (Alrex®), is indicated for the short-term use (typically less than 7-10 days) of allergic conjunctivitis, but should be used with caution. These medications are usually only needed in severe cases of allergic conjunctivitis, and can act as a "bridge" to another class of medication as listed above.
    Allergen immunotherapy. Allergy shots have been shown to be especially beneficial in the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis, and are the only therapy available that changes the underlying problem of allergies, potentially curing the problem of eye allergies.

    Sources:

    1) Ono SJ, Abelson MB. Allergic conjunctivitis: Update on pathophysiology and prospects for future treatment. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2005; 115:118-22.
    2) Bielory L. Allergic and Immunologic Disorders of the Eye. Part II: Ocular Allergy. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2000; 106:1019-

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    California USA
    Posts
    329
    Quote Originally Posted by skygoddess View Post
    Allergen immunotherapy. Allergy shots have been shown to be especially beneficial in the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis, and are the only therapy available that changes the underlying problem of allergies, potentially curing the problem of eye allergies
    This part is what I am most interested in. Allergy drops and allergy medications are effective treatments for symptom relief, but are not a "cure" for allergic inflammation. The potential cure comes from immunization shots or simply finding and removing the allergens from your daily life, if possible.

    From what I have read in the literature, ocular allergies are for the most part contact allergies and immunotherapy is not as effective for contact allergies as it is for systemic allergies. At least from what I have read.

    With either immunotherapy or allergen removal, you can potentially find a cure for the underlying problem.
    Last edited by Scout; 10-Nov-2009 at 13:58. Reason: clarity

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