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Calling all Chicago-ians

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  • Calling all Chicago-ians

    I did a search for Chicago, and it seems like there's a number of you on here. I'm contemplating a move to Chicago and I'm wondering if that is a stupid idea since I have dry eyes that are VERY sensitive to the environment - A/C, heater, moving air, wind chills, etc. I cannot open my eyes in these situations. I am fortunate to be currently living in a place with a very mild temperate climate of an average of 45-70 year round, so no A/C and rarely heat in the home.

    What do you all think? Is this completely stupid? Can you describe your weather for me? Please dont describe the stuff I can look up online, but more like from a dry eye point of view. For example, tell me if there is forced heat causing lots of moving air at every indoor place you visit in the winter? And finally, how do you deal with it?!!?

    Thanks!!!

    p.s. I don't wear goggles because I cannot find them even close to my prescription, nor can I find an optician willing to take on making a pair for me.
    Last edited by odydnas; 03-Feb-2010, 03:26. Reason: add information

  • #2
    My sister lives in Chicago. The reputation of it being the "Windy City" is true. The wind blows off Lake Michigan and it blows hard and cold! Of course, if you live in the suburbs, this won't really effect you. The midwest is notorious for being hot/humid in the summer and cold/dry in the winter. So the air conditioning and heat blasting is pretty much a norm. My suggestion would be to find an apt that has radiant heat (the kind that comes through the floorboards) instead of forced air heat. Also, you'll need to invest in a nice humidifier. The humidity in my house in Indiana is around 30-35% in the winter w/o a humidifier running. It's probably not any different in Chicago. As for being bothered when I go out...I don't really notice being any more miserable in a restaurant in Chicago than in one in San Francisco. I suppose it depends on where you go...you'll just have to find comfortable places by trial and error. All in all, it will be a lot different than living in a temperate climate.

    Personally...am I miserable in Indiana when I go somewhere and there's air blowing in my eyes? Yes, of course. Would I contemplate moving my family to Seattle just to avoid it...no. You find ways to manage it. Maybe you should visit first and see how it goes. February is an excellent time to see how horrible the winters can be in Chicago.

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    • #3
      Thanks for the info and suggestions! Interesting, I have heard both: Chicago isn't any windier than most cities AND Chicago is really windy!! If I do move, I will be living inside the city, probably near UIC.

      I like that you used San Francisco as a comparison, because that is why I currently live. My giant sunglasses help with the wind in SF. I can barely manage it here, I dont' know if I can manage it in Chicago...hm...I would LOVE to visit before I potentially make the move, but I'm so strapped for cash and everything that I won't be able to until spring/early summer.

      Is radiant heat common to find in Chicago? i'm not familiar w/ the different types of heating, since I rarely use it. I can't stand the heat in my home, which I believe is forced air heat since it's blowing out. Is that correct? Are the heaters found in cars considered to be for forced air heat because I CANNOT stand that. I don't think I've ever encountered radiant heat...anyone have experience with that and can comment how much more comfortable it is for DE?

      Another question: I cannot drive bc of DE, so is getting around Chicago easy w/o a car?

      I hope I get more Chicago opinions and responses.

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      • #4
        Interesting, I have heard both: Chicago isn't any windier than most cities AND Chicago is really windy!! If I do move, I will be living inside the city, probably near UIC.
        Chicago is really windy in the "loop" (downtown). UIC is more on the south end so....probably not as windy.

        Is radiant heat common to find in Chicago?
        I have no idea! But I'm sure if you look hard enough you can find an apartment that has it. Basically, they line the bottom of the floor with hot water tubing or with electrical wire. Either way the heat will rise up through the floor. There is no air to blow. This is great heat if you have cold feet!

        I can't stand the heat in my home, which I believe is forced air heat since it's blowing out. Is that correct? Are the heaters found in cars considered to be for forced air heat because I CANNOT stand that.
        Yes, you are correct. The car blower would be considered forced air as well.

        Another question: I cannot drive bc of DE, so is getting around Chicago easy w/o a car?
        Oh my gosh...YES! I know people that don't even own cars and haven't for years. If you plan on living around UIC there is plenty of public transportation. The train (the "El") is great. Plus there are lots of busses and cabs. You can definitely live in Chicago w/o a car, but I would recommend staying close to downtown. My sister and I take public transportation all the time (that way neither has to be the DD!)

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        • #5
          Chicago is not called the windy city because of the wind but because of the windy politicians in its history.

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